Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, and Synonyms

by | Aug 24, 2019 | English Vocabulary

Suparno Bhattachayrra

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Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms Suparno Bhattachayrra is a smart, experienced and talented writer from the India. Suparno loves to share his knowledge with others.

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Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, and Synonyms

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, and Synonyms

 

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INCARCERATE – Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, Synonyms, and Usage

 

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

 

 

Do you know the history and correct usage of the rare English word INCARCERATE ? In this learn English through weird and wonderful words and vocabulary class, I am going to show you the beauty of this weird and useful word of INCARCERATE.

 

INCARCERATE is a verb and pronounces as “ɪnˈkɑːsəreɪt“.

 

 

What is INCARCERATE? What does INCARCERATE mean? INCARCERATE meaning, definition & explanation

 

 

” From Medieval Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare (“to imprison”), from Latin in (“in”) + carcer (“a prison”), meaning “put behind lines (bars)” – Latin root is of a lattice or grid. Related to cancel (“cross out with lines”) and chancel (“area behind a lattice”). “imprison, shut up in jail,” 1550s, a back-formation from incarceration (q.v.), or else from Medieval Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare “to imprison.” Related: Incarcerated; incarcerating. “

Thank you, Merriam Webster, America’s most-trusted online dictionary.

 

 

 

Free Dictionary Friday: GCSE English Language – Word of the day #11 Incarcerate

 

 

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What is INCARCERATE?

 

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

 

Learn INCARCERATE Definition and Meaning

 

  • formal to put or keep someone in prison or in a place used as a prison.
  • to keep someone in a closed place and prevent them from leaving it .
Thank you,  Merriam-Webster, America’s most-trusted online dictionary.

 

 

 

 

Synonyms of INCARCERATE

 

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

 

Synonyms For INCARCERATE:

 

Thank you,  Thesaurus.com , the world’s largest and most trusted free online thesaurus.

 

 

 

Origin and Etymology of INCARCERATE

 

INCARCERATE Meaning, Definitions and Etymology from the world’s BEST renown and authority dictionary sources

 

 

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

 

 

    • INCARCERATE: to keep someone in a closed place and prevent them from leaving it. (Thank you, The cambridge dictionary , The most popular dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English. Meanings and definitions of words with pronunciations and translations.)
    • INCARCERATE: To lock away; to imprison, especially for breaking the law. Etymology: From Medieval Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare (“to imprison”), from Latin in (“in”) + carcer (“a prison”), meaning “put behind lines (bars)” – Latin root is of a lattice or grid. Related to cancel (“cross out with lines”) and chancel (“area behind a lattice”). (Thank you, The Wiktionary, the free dictionary)
    • INCARCERATE: to put or keep someone in prison. Etymology: (1500-1600) Latin past participle of incarcerare, from carcer “prison”. – (Thank you, The  ldoceonline, Longman English Dictionary is the leading dictionary for learners of English of all ages and levels who want to learn more about English: definitions, idioms.)
    • INCARCERATE: Spending time in prison:behind bars, captive, captivity. (Thank you, The Macmillan Dictionary, The Free Online English Dictionary from Macmillan Education.)
    • INCARCERATE: to enclose; constrict closely. Etymology: 1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerātus past participle of incarcerāre to imprison, equivalent to in carcer prison + -ātus -ate1. – (Thank you, The Dictionary is the world’s leading online source for English definitions, synonyms, word origins and etymologies, audio pronunciations, example sentences.)
    • INCARCERATE: Use the verb incarcerate when you need to put someone behind bars in a big way, meaning, send them to prison, like those who, after being found guilty of a crime and sentenced, become incarcerated. Etymology: The word incarcerate entered the English language in the sixteenth century, tracing back to the Latin word meaning “imprisoned.” If you incarcerate< people, that means you imprison them for a predetermined amount of time in a jail, prison, or a detention center. It’s good to know the meaning of incarcerate, but make sure you never get so close to it that you have firsthand knowledge of the word. – (Thank you, The vocabulary.com helps you learn new words, play games that improve your vocabulary, and explore language.)
    • INCARCERATE: Imprison or confine. Etymology: Mid 16th century (earlier (late Middle English) as incarceration): from medieval Latin incarcerat- ‘imprisoned’, from the verb incarcerare, from in- ‘into’ + Latin carcer ‘prison’. – (Thank you, The lexico, Powered by Oxford, Lexico’s Dictionary & Thesaurus offers trusted English definitions, synonyms, & grammar guides for native speakers & language learners.)
    • INCARCERATE: To shut in; confine. Etymology: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in-2 + carcer prison- (Thank you, The Free Dictionary.com, The Free Dictionary: Dictionary, Encyclopedia and Thesaurus.)
    •  INCARCERATE: If people are incarcerated, they are kept in a prison or other place. Etymology: < ML incarceratus, pp. of incarcerare, to imprison < L in, in + carcer, prison – (Thank you, Collins Dictionary, Pioneers in Language Reference for 200 years. Popular and trusted online dictionary with over 1 million words. Find definitions, meanings, synonyms.)

 

 

How to use INCARCERATE in a sentence?

 

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning Etymology and Synonyms

 

 

INCARCERATE – Grammar and Sentence Examples

 

  • Thousands of dissidents have been interrogated or incarcerated.
  • We were incarcerated in that broken elevator for four hours.
  • We’re spending billions of dollars each year on incarceration.
  • The governor announced his plan to incarcerate repeat offenders.
  • They were incarcerated for the duration of the war.
  • Thousands of dissidents have been interrogated or incarcerated.
  • It can cost $40,000 to $50,000 to incarcerate a prisoner for a year.
  • We were incarcerated in that broken elevator for four hours.
  • He spent nearly half his life incarcerated in prison.
  • Carter spent 19 years incarcerated in New Jersey on murder charges.
  • These problems and a long evening incarcerated below decks without fresh air were giving her a headache. Sentencedict.com
  • His failed attempts in seducing the young woman angered him to the point of incarcerating her.
  • Then the rest of the neighborhood brats also incarcerate their parents.
  • She’d been incarcerated for thirty years or so, poor imbecile.
  • Incarcerated in Terry’s room, they made do with sandwiches for dinner, and endless cups of tea.
  • He was incarcerated for years.
  • Ted is incarcerated in California, awaiting trial on murder charges.
  • Incarcerate me, sirs, I am a free born man!
  • He incarcerate in a stone tower.
  • Limits court authority to incarcerate offenders who commit drug crimes.
  • Why do you incarcerate yourself in the room every afternoon?
  • But I must keep incarcerate him.
  • She has been in an abusive marriage; he has been incarcerated for six years.
  • Much of the old building was still in disrepair when the brothers were incarcerated.
  • After that, suspects deemed to be an ongoing risk to national security can be incarcerated indefinitely by the home affairs minister.
  • There are too many people on death row who are innocent of the crimes for which they are incarcerated.
  • Many early studies, for example, were seriously flawed by their exclusive use of incarcerated offenders as samples of criminals.
  • Without effective treatment, many patients, like this lawyer, wind up homeless or incarcerated.
  • If a kid is on parole and his parole officer wishes to incarcerate him, there would be no room.

Thank you,  Sentence dictionary online – Good sentence examples for every word!

 

I hope you are enjoying this English class and found my “Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, Synonyms and Usage” is useful. Have fun as you learn with these weird and wonderful English words! Please add INCARCERATE and other weird and wonderful words to your vocabulary now. Thank you, Suparno Bhattachayrra

Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, and Synonyms

 

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Learn INCARCERATE Meaning, Etymology, and Synonyms

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