What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor

Sep 6, 2019English Grammar Tips, Smart Brains Spotlight

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why?

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

Linguistics Professor – Gareth Roberts

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor Smart Brains Spotlight


What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

 

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As explained by the linguistics professor Gareth Roberts  If people say something naturally, and don’t consider it a slip of the tongue (so we’ll exclude spoonerisms like “kinquering congs”), it is grammatical.

 

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What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor

Thank you, Linguistics Professor Gareth Roberts and Quora.

 

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The Grammar Factor

 

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why?

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

Linguistics Professor – Gareth Roberts

Fix your English Grammar

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor How can I become fluent in English?

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why

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What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor Advanced Grammar: Do You Know When It’s OK to Break the Rules?

 

 

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Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary Commas repeat again

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why?

 

 
What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor Answer by Linguistics Professor – Gareth Roberts, (Assistant professor of Linguistics, PhD from University of Edinburgh). All credit goes to Dr. Gareth Roberts, Thank you!

Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary Commas

What grammar rules do you know but break, and why? The Grammar Factor 7.6 / 10

 
 

Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary CommasEnglish Grammar

 

Does a linguistics professor count as a grammarian? “Not necessarily” is probably the answer, but the vast majority of linguists certainly know more about grammar than the vast majority of non-linguists (self-described grammarians included).

 

English grammar  As a linguist here’s my response to your question, and I’d venture to suggest that any other linguist would say something similar: If people say something naturally, and don’t consider it a slip of the tongue (so we’ll exclude spoonerisms like “kinquering congs”), it is grammatical. “Me, too” is a great example. It would be a perfectly normal response by native English speakers to a statement like, “I love ice cream!” That makes it grammatical in English be definition (at least in the varieties of English in which it occurs) . I would in fact go so far as to say that “I too” (as a complete sentence) is, by contrast, ungrammatical for most speakers of English.

 

It just doesn’t make sense to claim that something native speakers of English say regularly when they speak English is ungrammatical in English. It’s like Aristotle’s claim that women have a different number of teeth from men. The correct response to discovering he was wrong is not to berate women for having incorrect mouths, or praise them for being rebels; it’s to revise the claim.

 

That’s not to say that “me, too” is necessarily grammatical in all varieties of English. Some things are grammatical in some dialects or registers and not in others. But treating colloquial varieties of English as breaking the rules of formal writing is like treating baseball as badly played cricket.

 

If you want to know what is and is not grammatical in your language, observe how people use it and try to figure out what rules they’re actually following. Starting with the rules is getting it ass-backwards.

 

Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary Commas repeat again


Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary Commas repeat again

 

English grammar Reference: Linguistics Professor – Gareth Roberts, “Grammarians, what grammar rules do you know but break, and why? Do you use colloquial terms you know are grammatically wrong like “me, too” when you’re in casual conversation?” originally appeared on Quora, the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. Punctuation Mistakes: Unnecessary Commas repeat again

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