What are the most common grammar mistakes we make in English?

Sep 19, 2019English Grammar Tips, Smart Brains Spotlight

Who vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well

Who vs Whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were

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Kory Stamper

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Who vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well

 

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Who vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well The topic for today is “What are the most common grammar mistakes we make in English?“. Learning should be for life. Every moment of every day we are being presented with new and important lessons. Here we will present you one handpicked new and important lesson every day from smart brains and experts around the world.

 

What are the most common grammar mistakes we make in English? Kory shares with your the 3 most common English grammar mistakes we make.

 

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Who vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well

 

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Who vs Whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were

Fix your English Grammar

Kory Stamper

Fix your English Grammar

I can understand and write it but could not speak English! How can I become fluent in English?

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Three most common grammar mistakes we make in English

 

 
Who vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well Answer by Kory Stamper, ( Lexicographer & Author of Word by Word ). All credit goes to Kory Stamper, Thank you!

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Fix your English GrammarWho vs whom, Than I vs Than Me, Was vs Were well

 

 

Depends on what you mean by “grammar.” Most people lump all sorts of things into that label that aren’t, by linguists’ standards, actually about grammar: misspellings, misplaced apostrophes, jargon, etc. So I’ll focus on three things that actually touch a bit on grammar.

 

 

How and Where to use Can and Could Who” vs. “whom”: This confuses even the best of us, and people tend to hypercorrect themselves and use “whom” any time they aren’t sure which one to use. In general, “whom” is used when it’s the object of a verb, and “who” when it’s the subject of a verb. The confusion often happens in question: “Who/whom got the invitation?” “You gave that invitation to who/whom?” The trick is to substitute “he” for “who” and “him” for “whom.” So it’s “Who/he got the invitation?” and “You gave that invitation to him/whom?”   I can understand and write it but could not speak English

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How and Where to use Can and Could “Than I” vs. “than me”: This is a grammatical mess, really, and it’s “than’s” fault. “Than” can either be a conjunction joining two clauses (“She’s messier than I am”) or a preposition (“She’s messier than me”). In general, if you go with “than I,” add the verb after it; if you drop the verb, use “me.”

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How and Where to use Can and Could “Was” vs. “were”: The subjunctive. Bleh. The subjunctive is a mood of English verbs that gets used to describe wishes, hypothetical situations, demands, suggestions, and conditions that are contrary to fact. If you’re still with me, the form for most English subjunctive verbs is identical to the infinitive form: “He demanded that she leave the premises.” The problem is that the subjunctive form of the verb “be” isn’t “be,” but “were.” (English!) Because “were” is also a past form of the verb “be,” people often substitute in “was” accidentally. The general rule is this: if you’re talking about something that isn’t real right now, and you’re using the verb “be,” you should probably use “were” and not “was”: “if I were a rich man [but I’m not]”; “if I were you [but I’m not, and you should be grateful for that, trust me]”; “if it were up to be [but it’s not, and again, ditto on the grateful].”    

 

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How and Where to use Can and Could

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How and Where to use Can and Could Reference: Kory Stamper, “What are the most common grammar mistakes we make in English?.” originally appeared on Quora, the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. Fix your English Grammar

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