Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Aug 15, 2019English and Study Tips, Smart Brains Spotlight

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Hannah Yang

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive Smart Brains Spotlight


 

 

You learn something new every day; what did you learn today?

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive The topic for today is “Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive“. Learning should be for life. Every moment of every day we are being presented with new and important lessons. Here we will present you one handpicked new and important lesson every day from smart brains and experts around the world.

 

The following study hacks’ secret makes your life and studies simpler by helping to increase productivity levels, help concentration, eliminate distractions and boost focus.

 

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Susana Yana Avila

Smart Brains Spotlight Selection

English Language Academy Moderator (L.2)

 

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Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Thanks, Hannah Yang and Quora.

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Study Hacks

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

Hannah Yang

How To Use “Have Been” and “Had Been” In English?

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive How can I become fluent in English?

How To Use “Have Been” and “Ha d Been” In English?

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive 5 Proven Study Hacks to WORK SMARTER, Not HARDER

 

 

Thank you, youtube –  UnJaded Jade.

 

 

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

 

 
Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive Answer by Hannah Yang, (traveling around the sun for the 23rd time, studied at Yale University). All credit goes to Hannah Yang, Thank you!
 
 
Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive 7.6 / 10
 

How To Use “Have Been” and “Had Been” In English?

Back in middle school, I had a teacher who often disguised his lessons as games.

 

One time, he split the class into groups of six, and gave each group a sheet of grid paper. Then he took out a box of extra large candy bars and plopped it onto his desk for all to see.

 

“Today, we’ll be playing an advanced version of tic-tac-toe,” he said. “Your goal is to get four in a row on a five-by-five grid. Does everyone understand what that means?”

 

We nodded hungrily.

 

“Okay,” he continued. “Within your group of six, three of you will form a team that takes turns drawing X’s, and the other three will form a team that takes turns drawing O’s. If your team draws your symbol in four squares in a row – up, down, or diagonally – then your team wins a candy bar. Those are the only rules. Cool?”

 

Another enthusiastic nod.

 

“Great. I’ll give you five minutes, starting…now.”

 

My teammates and I turned to face our opponents, racking our brains for strategies to prevent them from getting to four in a row. We had a real sweet tooth for those candy bars. We were ruthless. We were at war. When we emerged victorious, we glowed with triumph.

 

Then, when the five minutes were up, our teacher asked every group to describe their results to the class.

 

Most of the games had ended in an impasse, with both teams blocking up each other’s crucial squares until neither of them could win.

 

Some of the games had ended in a victory, like mine. In those groups, either the X team or the O team had won a candy bar and split it into thirds.

 

And then there was one group, in the back of the classroom, where the six students were happily munching away at six candy bars.

 

  As it turned out, the teacher never mentioned that only one team could win each game. When those students realized that it didn’t have to be a competition, they’d simply agreed to share the board. The X team drew four X’s in the first row, and the O team drew four O’s in the second, and just like that, both teams had won.

 

They also realized that the teacher also never specified how many times a team can win. So they kept on drawing four X’s and four O’s, until they’d received a pile of candy bars and didn’t have any room left on their grid.

 

The teacher then asked us to take a step back and think. Where in our lives, he asked, are we fabricating competition, when we really could be working together? Where in our lives are we assuming there’s some obstacle that doesn’t necessarily have to be there?

 

  Even after seven years, I still live by that concept. It’s one of the reasons why I make study groups with my classmates, instead of treating them as competition. It’s one of the reasons why I celebrate the successes of other candidates in my field, instead of vying to outshine them.

 

Working hard:

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

 

Working smart:

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive Reference: Hannah Yang.  “What are some uncommon ways to work smarter instead of harder?” originally appeared on Quora, the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. Top English Self Study Tips You Don’t Want to Miss Work Smarter, Not Harder : The Secret to Be More Productive

If you think about it, our lives are an endless pursuit of answers and new questions. So how can YOU take action to ensure that your learning never comes to an end?

 

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